Victoria Finkle

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The House passed two controversial regulatory relief bills Wednesday evening ahead of the looming yearend budget fight.
The White House threatened to veto two bills on Tuesday — one that would mandate new cost-benefit requirements on the Federal Reserve and the other to allow loans held in portfolio to qualify as a “qualified mortgage.”
The House approved a bill Monday night capping pay for Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac's top executives, sending the measure to President Obama's desk to be signed into law.
Rep. Paul Ryan’s expected election as House Speaker this week may ultimately prove a boon for the banking industry — especially for critics of the Dodd-Frank Act and the current mortgage finance system.
The White House is pushing back on suggestions that it will cut a deal to recapitalize Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac before the end of President Obama’s term, putting the pressure back on Congress for a solution.
Despite their major push to overhaul the housing finance market last Congress, Sens. Bob Corker, R-Tenn., and Mark Warner, D-Va., offered little optimism Tuesday that structural reform is on its way anytime soon.
A handful of moderate Democrats are supporting a controversial bill to restructure the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, and are expected to help the House Financial Services Committee approve the legislation.
A bipartisan group of housing experts is seeking to inject more discussion about the mortgage market into presidential campaigns.
GOP presidential contender Jeb Bush unveiled a plan to reform the regulatory process, including at agencies like the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.
A bipartisan group of senators reintroduced a bill Wednesday that would prohibit lawmakers from using certain housing finance fees to offset unrelated government spending.
The Senate passed a bipartisan bill late Tuesday that would cap executive pay at Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac.
The window for moving financial services regulatory relief through Congress is rapidly closing, but there appears to be little hope that the partisan tensions that have stalled the process will ease in time.
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