The Federal Reserve Board should impose tough restrictions on prepayment penalties in the subprime market, according to an FDIC advisory committee, as a way to prevent mortgage brokers from "steering" borrowers into higher interest-rate loans."Lenders will not pay [an excessive] yield spread premium, which is the incentive structure for steering, unless they have a prepayment penalty," Martin Eakes, chief executive of Self-Help Credit Union, told his fellow members on the advisory board. The Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. advisory committee agreed to send a letter to the Fed urging it to restrict prepayment penalties at the end of all-day discussion on subprime lending problems. In the subprime market, prepayment penalties can equal six months' worth of interest payments. Under the recommendation, lenders could only charge a penalty that recovers the administrative costs of setting up a new loan. The Fed is considering changes to its Home Ownership and Equity Protection Act regulations to ban certain subprime lending practices that it deems unfair or deceptive.

Subscribe Now

Authoritative analysis and perspective for every segment of the mortgage industry

30-Day Free Trial

Authoritative analysis and perspective for every segment of the mortgage industry